Final Newsletter – Nov. 4


Colin Doyle for President 2016

The 3 core issues: environmental responsibility, nuclear abolition, and democratic engagement. There’s much more at the campaign website:

READ MORE

New additions to the campaign library

In the final push to put everything I want to express onto the campaign website (as well as YouTube and facebook), there is a wave of final additions.  The types are:
1.  Lightly edited entries from a blog I wrote on a friend’s website in 2009.  In retrospect you could say it was the framework for my Presidential campaign platform — focused on avoiding the dual threat of ecological and nuclear destruction, and exposing its cultural roots, all with the goal of life thriving worldwide.Link.
2.  Professionally-made Infographics that each highlight a specific issue, such as air pollution or citizens’ displeasure with corporate corruption of elected leaders.  Link.
3.  On facebook candidates for elected office are given the option to summarize their issues. I did so for 9 of them (briefly – 200 characters max!).  I think this feature allows voters to compare candidates on shared topics, like climate change. Link.

.

Gratifying moment of the month

Impressive levels of online support from Sierra Leone

One technique for getting wider exposure is to boost a post on facebook, paying a little bit so people I don’t already know can see it.  I did this with a handful of the juiciest videos over the past year, such as “We Shouldn’t be Let Off this Planet” (link), “Don’t Be a Chump Trump” (link), and the one in which I use 15 languages (link).
I sometimes included facebook users in other countries, both for fun and because I believe citizens worldwide should have a say in who becomes President of the U.S. (because it affects them).  In June one such video caught on in Sierra Leone, where I lived for a few months in 2007 — nearly 600 likes from there! (link)  Just the other day, a simple facebook post asking for endorsements received even more support in Sierra Leone – nearly 1300 likes there (link).  Wow!  Ah no sabi wetin de bi, but it’s great to receive the affirmation.

Here’s a picture of me with a futbol team na Salone:

E4lqw2mJ1EJ7VYGJW0vuGJsIILjBiRLgCDFIz7xdRnG9nwv2jIfgXgXm1Kt9jnNd4Gqg6_7BVY7ZqNn9xIki1mrlXf-AYbk2niOhzga2pkiei3UfC0T0bwFEng4aARGCESJOmmhiX3woid7AJJC-BhLUSHME3YlP_U1ccnk=s0-d-e1-ft.jpg

.

It’s been an interesting ride…

‘Twas educational & insightful for this small candidate

It was June 2015 when I decided, after much thought and introspection, to indeed run for President of the United States. Even though it was nothing I’d ever had any interest in doing, it was right for me to do so (I can tell you more later).  Ay, la vida…

On this path, I learned business skills such as starting a simple company, building a website, making this logo, using online tools, and working with staff remotely, as well as how federal elections work (the FEC is great!).
Other lessons were:

  • Tons of people are not satisfied with the standard D/R option, but are drowned out by the people and forces that are.
  • Likewise, tons of college-aged Americans are already so turned off by ‘politics’ that elected office is left for an older and less ethical set.
  • Don’t expect anyone to step up the plate for me. [Though a contribution to offset some of my person expense would be wonderful. Link.]
  • Having reason on my side doesn’t count for much when it comes to elections.  Impassioned speeches and money do.
  • People I have a personal relationship with give moral support, but it’s hard to get others’ attention — at least without doing publicity stunts that undermine my integrity, which is the basis of my candidacy.  And that integrity remains as strong as ever.

Overall, it was a bold yet quiet undertaking, a seedling in need of more fertilizer, a paddler trying to reverse the direction of the beaching ship, a worthy cause.

Finally, as I sign off, I encourage you to:

  • Use your right to one lever pull to vote for the best candidate you know of.  Who do you want in the White House?  Consider write-ins or “None of the Above.”
  • Keep the new President accountable.
  • Get involved in local leadership – in your county, town, or neighborhood.  This is the future of governance, as the world becomes larger again and we (thankfully) are compelled to relocalize.
  • Contribute to the broad social change this movement is actually about.  It goes far beyond a single President – it’s an urgent worldwide need. You can do your part in many ways – be creative!  I’ll enjoy watching.
  • Push in strong and subtle ways for what you feel is right, but don’t forget to season life with humor.  And together Let’s Wise Up!